Pigment Theory

Pigment Breakdown:

Soft Red: Classic red. This rich, red pigment has cool undertones that adds depth for a soft red lip. Fitzpatrick 1-4.

Peach: Always in season. A warm peachy pigment for a subtle effect. Use it on its own or as a warm modifier for lips. Fitzpatrick 1-4.

Flame: Ignite an inner flame! This vivid orange pigment will add warmth to any lip and cancel cool tones. Use on its own or as a warm modifier for lips. Fitzpatrick 1-6.

Orange Coral: Orange meets pink. This warm pigment cancels cool tones for a peach-red lip reminiscent of tropical orange-toned coral. Fitzpatrick 1-4.

Pink Coral: A perfect pink-orange pigment for clients looking for a natural effect with a pop of coral for vibrancy. Fitzpatrick 1-4.

Perfect Pink: Pretty in Pink! This best-selling pigment results in a neutral and effortless pink lip. Fitzpatrick 1-4.

Wine: A bite of dark cherry. This intense burgundy, deep red/purple pigment results in a rich wine color. Fitzpatrick 2-4.

Pink Rose: A look inspired by spring blooms. This neutral-cool pigment is a popular pick for a vivid pink look. Fitzpatrick 1-4.

Magenta: Vibrant in magenta. Get a more traditional look with this best-selling cool pigment, resulting in a mid-toned berry pink, perfect for every occasion. Fitzpatrick 1-4.

Nude: Go-to nude. This neutral pigment is less pink than Dusty Pink and lighter than Cinnamon for a beautiful, soft, natural pinky-brown nude. Fitzpatrick 1-2.

Cinnamon: A dash of cinnamon. This neutral-warm pigment is casual and clean — results in a browny-pink nude look. Mix it or try it on its own. Fitzpatrick 1-4.

Dusty Pink: Delicately pink. This neutral pigment is our most popular lip shade, resulting in a super soft, understated pink tone. Fitzpatrick 1-3.

Fitzpatrick Type 1 – Warm skin tone

You always burn and never tan in the sun. You are extremely susceptible to skin damage as well as cancers like basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. You are also at very high risk for melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer. Generally, follow The Skin Cancer Foundation’s prevention tips but use a sunscreen with a SPF of 30+ and clothing with a UPF rating of 30 or higher. Seek the shade whenever you are out in the sun. Check your skin head-to-toe each month, paying careful attention to any suspicious growths, and make sure you have an annual professional skin check-up.

Fitzpatrick Type 2 – Warm skin tone

You almost always burn and rarely tan in the sun. You are highly susceptible to skin damage as well as cancers like basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. You are also at substantial risk for melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer. Generally, follow The Skin Cancer Foundation’s prevention tips but also consider using a sunscreen with a SPF of 30+ and clothing with a UPF rating of 30 or higher. Seek the shade whenever you are out in the sun. Check your skin head-to-toe each month, paying careful attention to any suspicious growths, and make sure you have an annual professional skin check-up.

Fitzpatrick Type 3 – Warm skin tone

You sometimes burn and sometimes tan in the sun. You are susceptible to skin damage as well as cancers like basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. You are also at risk for melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer. Be sure to apply a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 every day, wear sun-protective clothing, and seek the shade between 10 AM and 4 PM, when the sun is strongest. Check your skin head-to-toe each month, paying careful attention to any suspicious growths, and make sure you have an annual professional skin check-up.

Fitzpatrick Type 4 – Warm skin tone

You tend to tan easily and are less likely to burn. But you are still at risk; use sunscreen with an SPF of 15+ outside and seek the shade between 10 AM and 4 PM. Follow all other Prevention Tips from The Skin Cancer Foundation as well. Check your skin head-to-toe each month, paying careful attention to any suspicious growths, and make sure you have an annual professional skin check-up.

Fitzpatrick Type 5 – Cool skin tone

You tan easily and rarely burn, but you are still at risk. Use sunscreen with an SPF of 15+ and seek the shade between 10 AM and 4 PM. Acral lentiginous, a less common form of melanoma that often becomes dangerous because it is detected later than other melanomas, is the dominant form of the disease among darker-skinned people. These melanomas tend to appear on parts of the body not often exposed to the sun, and often remain undetected until after the cancer has spread.

Check your skin head-to-toe each month, paying careful attention to any suspicious growths, and make sure you have an annual professional skin check-up. Keep an eye out for any suspicious growths, especially on the palms, soles of the feet and mucous membranes.

Fitzpatrick Type 6 – Cool skin tone

Although you do not burn, you are still at risk for skin cancers, and should wear sunscreen with an SPF of 15+ and seek the shade between 10 AM and 4 PM. Acral lentiginous, a less common form of melanoma that often becomes dangerous because it is detected later than other melanomas, is the dominant form of the disease among darker-skinned people. These melanomas tend to appear on parts of the body not often exposed to the sun, and often remain undetected until after the cancer has spread. Check your skin head-to-toe each month, paying careful attention to any suspicious growths, and make sure you have an annual professional skin check-up. Keep an eye out for any suspicious growths, especially on the palms, soles of the feet and mucous membranes.

What shade will suit your clients skin tone?

Some faces can get away with bold, bright red lips, but let’s face it, most of us look like a clown gone wrong when we attempt the big red look. The colours you can get away with will depend heavily on your clients skin tone and complexion, so it’s important to understand colour theory before making any decisions on your clients skin pigmentation shade.

As a rule, a skin tone is easy to define and will help you pick your clients lip pigment with ease:

Identify your undertone: Look at the veins on your wrist. If they are blue, you have cooler, pink undertones, if they are green, you have warmer, yellow undertones. If they are both blue and green, you’re a lucky neutral who can get away with pretty much anything.

Understand which shades go with which tone:

  • Yellow undertones work well with warm colours.
  • pink undertones look great with blue or purple hues.

OK, so you know whether you’re going for warm or cool, but with potentially hundreds of precise pigments to choose from, what else should you consider to help you choose the ideal tone? Thinking about your client’s skin colouring can help a lot too, and whether their naturally perfectly pale or richly tanned, you can find a great colour for them.

Super pale skin

If you’re very pale, your best bet is to go for a nude toned colour. Think peachy shades that you can overlay with a nude gloss for a perfect daytime look. Avoid dark shades of brown or burgundy, as they’ll contrast too much with your pale skin.

Dark skin

Very dark complexions have a wide choice of lip colours, lucky you! Try out coral shades or pigments with an orange element for a fun pop of colour. Stay away from chalky colours or those with too much white in.

Olive skin

If you’ve got a lovely olive complexion, you’ll do well in warm, natural tones. Look for sunset reds, perky coral and warm amber too complement your skin. Avoid purple as it will bring out the yellow in your skin and make you look sallow. Brown will look too monochromatic.

Yellow undertones

If you’re not quite olive but not pale either, you’ll look great in blue based reds. Flesh tones and bronzes also work really well, but steer clear of purple if you don’t want to look too yellow.

Pink undertones

Again, if you’re between pale and olive but have pink undertones, stick to peach tones for a natural look. For a more eye popping combination, try brick red or orange based reds, but don’t go for blue based reds as they’ll clash horribly.

Light Asian skin

You’ll no doubt have lovely full lips and a natural coral undertone to your skin, so complement this with beautiful coral lips and plenty of highlighting lip gloss. You can get away with bold reds too, but don’t bother with the nudes as they’ll just make your skin look pasty.

Super Dark and South Asian Skin

For those with much darker or Southern Asian skin, choosing a lip colour can be a tough decision. You have natural blue subtones to your lips which could result in a colour not being quite the shade you had hoped for. To accommodate this, we usually apply a bright orange colour at the first appointment, which will bring a warmth and richness to your lip colour you’ll love. This base layer can help you achieve the colour your looking for at the second appointment.