SETTING UP

Seating when offering Pedicure services, you should ensure that both Client and you are comfortable during the treatment. A high-backed comfortable armchair is best for your client with a low stool for yourself that prevents you from bending over the client. Some therapists like to work on a treatment couch, and this is ok too.

When offering Manicure services, you should ensure that both Client and you are comfortable during the treatment. A high-backed comfortable armchair is best for your client with an adjustable high-backed chair for yourself that prevents you from bending over the nail desk.

Drawers/Desk You need somewhere to keep your equipment and products within reach. There are specialist pedicure trolleys for this, or you can use your nail desk or a shelf or another surface that can be brought close to you whilst you are working.

Adequate Lighting Good lighting is essential to prevent you from straining your eyes whilst working on your clients. If you cannot have natural sunlight, then ensure the room itself is well lit with high voltage lighting. A nail lamp is ideal to give you additional light over your working area without creating shadows.

Electricity Supply You should be as close to a plug socket as possible to prevent trailing wires and possible accidents.

Ventilation Councils are now trying to ensure that anyone offering nail services has adequate ventilation in place to remove dust and fumes from the environment. You can purchase dust and fume extractors to add to your working area and ensure windows can be easily opened to allow fresh air in too.

Towels You will need plenty of towels for your treatment. One on the floor for preventing spillages, and three on your knee for the treatment itself. A modesty towel may also be given to your client if she is wearing a skirt. Towels should be washed at 90 degrees centigrade.

Emery Boards Emery Boards have two sides a courser side and s finer side. Use the finer side on Manicures and the Course side on Pedicures.

Orange Sticks Can be used to push back cuticle and cleaning up nail polish from the cuticle.

Cuticle Knife/Pusher A stainless-steel tool that should be used to gently push back the cuticle from the nail plate. This must be sterilised between clients.

Cuticle Nippers A stainless-steel tool that look like a small pair of pliers. These can be used to trim away excess cuticle or Hang nails.

Spatulas Useful to use to take products out of jars to prevent cross contamination.

Disinfectant Jar A small jar next to you with a disinfectant for keeping tools clean between clients.

Tissues A good supply of tissues can help to clean up excess product, wrap sterilised tools in or use between the toes as a toe separator.

Cotton Wool A good supply of cotton wool should be close buy. An alternative to this is Gauze Pads.

Nail Polish Remover This contains a solvent such as Acetone which removes nail varnish from the nail plate. Acetone free Nail Polish Remover is far gentler on the nail plate and less dehydrating.

Cuticle Cream This is used to soften the cuticle so that it can be pushed back without damaging the tissues underneath the nail or the nail plate itself.

Cuticle Remover This works by breaking down the Eponychium so that it can be easily removed off the nail plate. Cuticle remover is an irritant and should not be left on the skin for long periods of time.

Buffers A buffing file or buffing paste helps to create a natural shine on the nail plate and remover or reduce the appearance of ridges. This is great for clients that do not want to wear nail varnish.

Moisturiser Used to hydrate the skin post treatment. This cream should be light and not leave a sticky film or residue on the skin.